The Ukrainian minesweeping dog that took the internet by storm has now successfully sniffed out ‘hundreds of Russian explosives’.

Patron (Bullet in English) is an adorable two-and-a-half-year-old Jack Russell helping to remove mines left by retreating Russian forces in the Chernihiv region, north of Kyiv.

The hero pooch first made headlines last month after he was pictured at work donning a miniature Ukrainian military vest.

Since then the landscape of the conflict has changed dramatically with Vladimir Putin pulling troops out of northern Ukraine where their war effort was faltering badly.

Following the horrifying discoveries of murdered civilians in mass graves in regions formerly occupied by Russia, the Ukrainian Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced that a number of “booby-trap” mines were also left behind.

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Patron started his minesweeping career when he was just six-months-old

They said in a statement: “While retreating, Russia’s military personnel is massively setting up booby-traps, banned by the international law, even on food facilities, private housing and human corpses.”

Fortunately, Ukrainian demining teams have their furry secret weapon helping to ensure the formerly occupied regions are made safe.

The BBC reports that Patron’s super senses have now been responsible for “hundreds” of Russian mines being removed.



He works by sniffing out the odour of explosives and other chemicals leaking from inside mines
He works by sniffing out the odour of explosives and other chemicals leaking from inside mines

Working alongside the Ukrainian Emergency Services, Patron has been seen busily searching through the rubble of destroyed towns where clean up efforts continue.

Patron started his minesweeping career when he was just six-months-old and is said to love cheese and belly rubs.

Like all mine detection dogs, he works by sniffing out the odour of explosives and other chemicals leaking from inside the devices.

Some breeds of dogs, including Jack Russell Terriers, have a heightened sense of smell and are exceptionally skilled at discriminating target odours from other background smells, making them more effective than human demining squads.

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The use of mine detection dogs dates back to the Second World War
The use of mine detection dogs dates back to the Second World War

The olfactory centre in the brains of dogs – responsible for their sense of smell – is around 40 times larger, proportionally, than it is in humans.

The use of mine detection dogs dates back to the Second World War but it is only in recent years that they have been used globally.

It is thought that there are over 750 dogs working in humanitarian demining programmes around the world.

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